Welcome to Biotrition, Inc.

3633 West Lake Avenue, Suite 201A Glenview, IL 60026
director@biotrition.com

About Us

 Common Symptoms of a Food Allergy:

HEAD: dizziness, drowsiness, faintness, fullness in head, headaches, insomnia, sleepy after meals

EYES: blurring of vision, watery eyes

NOSE: recurrent sinusitis, recurrent sores, runny nose, stuffy nose

EARS: earaches, fluid in middle ear, fullness in ears, hearing loss, itching, recurrent infections, ringing

THROAT: canker sores, chronic cough, gagging, itchy roof of mouth, soreness

HEART & LUNGS: asthma, congestion in chest, hoarseness, increased heart rate, palpitations, rapid heart rate GASTROINTESTINAL: bloating, colitis, constipation, pains, cramps, diarrhea, gas, nausea, vomiting

SKIN: dermatitis, eczema, hives, rashes

PSYCHOLOGICAL: aggressiveness, anxiety, crying jags, depression, hyperactivity, indifference, irritability

OTHER: binge eating, fatigue, hunger, joint aches & pains, muscle aches & pains, swelling of joints in hands or feet, vaginal discharge, weakness 

 Common Symptoms of a Food Allergy:

HEAD: dizziness, drowsiness, faintness, fullness in head, headaches, insomnia, sleepy after meals

EYES: blurring of vision, watery eyes

NOSE: recurrent sinusitis, recurrent sores, runny nose, stuffy nose

EARS: earaches, fluid in middle ear, fullness in ears, hearing loss, itching, recurrent infections, ringing

THROAT: canker sores, chronic cough, gagging, itchy roof of mouth, soreness

HEART & LUNGS: asthma, congestion in chest, hoarseness, increased heart rate, palpitations, rapid heart rate GASTROINTESTINAL: bloating, colitis, constipation, pains, cramps, diarrhea, gas, nausea, vomiting

SKIN: dermatitis, eczema, hives, rashes

PSYCHOLOGICAL: aggressiveness, anxiety, crying jags, depression, hyperactivity, indifference, irritability

OTHER: binge eating, fatigue, hunger, joint aches & pains, muscle aches & pains, swelling of joints in hands or feet, vaginal discharge, weakness 

 DIAGNOSIS OF FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITY AND FOOD INTOLERANCE
by the FOOD INTOLERANCE TEST

Recent estimates suggest that about 10% of the population exhibit clinical symptoms attributable directly to food hypersensitivity and food intolerance. Many more suffer from other allergies or ill defined medical problems which may be aggravated by their diets.

Food allergies are divided into two major categories:
Permanent or fixed allergies: Approximately 5% of food allergies are fixed allergies in which a patient already knows the offending foods which disagree with him. In such cases the relationship between food and symptoms is obvious.
Concealed or masked allergies: Approximately 95% of food allergies fall into this category in which a patient is not aware of the foods that disagree with him. These allergies therefore require special diagnostic testing with follow-up counseling and education. Masked allergies are associated with the foods that a susceptible individual eats frequently.
Food Intolerance Test:
In the food intolerance test a food allergen and patient blood, rich in white cells and platelets, are mixed together, incubated and observed under a phase contrast microscope. In the presence of allergenic foods, the red cells, white cells and platelets show toxic effects during which the white cells (neutrophils) become immobile and die and/or the platelets aggregate. In sharp contrast the red cells, white cells and platelets remain healthy with nonallergenic foods.The food intolerance test diagnoses fixed as well as masked allergies. Reports in the literature indicate a 70% success rate in patients who underwent the food intolerance test and dietary manipulations. The skin test, on the other hand, has been reported, at best, to have a 20% accuracy in diagnosing food allergies1. 

 DIAGNOSIS OF FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITY AND FOOD INTOLERANCE
by the FOOD INTOLERANCE TEST

Recent estimates suggest that about 10% of the population exhibit clinical symptoms attributable directly to food hypersensitivity and food intolerance. Many more suffer from other allergies or ill defined medical problems which may be aggravated by their diets.

Food allergies are divided into two major categories:
Permanent or fixed allergies: Approximately 5% of food allergies are fixed allergies in which a patient already knows the offending foods which disagree with him. In such cases the relationship between food and symptoms is obvious.
Concealed or masked allergies: Approximately 95% of food allergies fall into this category in which a patient is not aware of the foods that disagree with him. These allergies therefore require special diagnostic testing with follow-up counseling and education. Masked allergies are associated with the foods that a susceptible individual eats frequently.
Food Intolerance Test:
In the food intolerance test a food allergen and patient blood, rich in white cells and platelets, are mixed together, incubated and observed under a phase contrast microscope. In the presence of allergenic foods, the red cells, white cells and platelets show toxic effects during which the white cells (neutrophils) become immobile and die and/or the platelets aggregate. In sharp contrast the red cells, white cells and platelets remain healthy with nonallergenic foods.The food intolerance test diagnoses fixed as well as masked allergies. Reports in the literature indicate a 70% success rate in patients who underwent the food intolerance test and dietary manipulations. The skin test, on the other hand, has been reported, at best, to have a 20% accuracy in diagnosing food allergies1. 

Alphabetical List Of Foods Tested:

Alfalfa Sprouts Allspice Almond

Amaranth Anise Seed Apple

Apricot Arrowroot Artichoke

Asparagus Avocado

Bakers Yeast Banana BarleyBasil

Bass Bay Leaf Bean Sprouts Beef

Beet Beet Sugar Black Pepper Black Walnut Blackberry Black-eyed Pea Blue Cheese Blueberry

Brazil Nut Brewers Yeast Broccoli Brussel Sprouts Buckwheat Butter

Buttermilk Cabbage Cane Sugar Canola Oil Cantalope Caraway Carob Carp Carrot Cashew Catfish Cauliflower Caviar Celery Cheddar Cheese Cherry Chestnuts Chicken

Chicken Egg White Chicken Egg Yolk Chick-Pea (Garbanzos) Chicory

Chili Pepper Chives Cinnamon Clam

Clove Cocoa-Chocolate Coconut Cod Coffee Cola Corn (Maize) Cottage Cheese Cotton Seed Oil Cow's Milk Crab Cranberry Cucumber Cumin Seed Curry Date

Dillseed Duck Eggplant Endive

English Walnut Fig Filbert Flounder

Food Coloring Mix Frog's Legs

Garden Peppers (Bell) Garlic Gelatin Ginger Goat's Milk Grape Grapefruit Haddock Halibut Herring Honey Honeydew Melon Hops Horseradish

Kale Kidney Bean Lake Perch Lake Trout Lamb Lemon Lentil Lettuce

Lima Bean Lime Lobster Mackerel

Malt Mango Maple Sugar Marjoram

Maroon Sweet Potato (Yam) Millet

Molasses Mozzarella Cheese MSG Mung Bean Mushroom Mustard

Nectarine Nutmeg (Mace)         Nutra Sweet Oats Okra Olive Onion

Orange Orange Roughy Fish Oregano Oyster Papaya Paprika

Parmesan Cheese Parsley Parsnip

Pea Peach Peanut Pear Pecan

Peppermint (Spearmint) Pheasant

Pike Pimiento Pineapple Pinto Bean

Pistachio Nut Plum (Prune) Pomegranate Pork Potato Provolone Cheese Pumpkin Quinoa Radish

Raspberry Red Snapper Rhubarb

Rice Rosemary Rutabaga Rye

Saccharin Safflower Seed Sage

Salicylate Salmon Sardine Scallops

Sea Perch Sesame Shark Shrimp

Smelt Sodium Metabisulfite Sole Sorbitol Sorghum Soybean Spelt

Spinach Split Pea Squash Mix

Strawberry String Bean (Green)

Sunflower Swiss Chard Swiss Cheese Swordfish Tapioca- Cassava-Yucca Tea Thyme Tobacco

Tomato Turmeric Tuna Turkey Turnip Vanilla Water Chestnuts

Watercress Watermelon Wheat Wheat Bran Wild Rice Yellow Sweet Potato Yogurt 

Alphabetical List Of Foods Tested:

Alfalfa Sprouts Allspice Almond

Amaranth Anise Seed Apple

Apricot Arrowroot Artichoke

Asparagus Avocado

Bakers Yeast Banana BarleyBasil

Bass Bay Leaf Bean Sprouts Beef

Beet Beet Sugar Black Pepper Black Walnut Blackberry Black-eyed Pea Blue Cheese Blueberry

Brazil Nut Brewers Yeast Broccoli Brussel Sprouts Buckwheat Butter

Buttermilk Cabbage Cane Sugar Canola Oil Cantalope Caraway Carob Carp Carrot Cashew Catfish Cauliflower Caviar Celery Cheddar Cheese Cherry Chestnuts Chicken

Chicken Egg White Chicken Egg Yolk Chick-Pea (Garbanzos) Chicory

Chili Pepper Chives Cinnamon Clam

Clove Cocoa-Chocolate Coconut Cod Coffee Cola Corn (Maize) Cottage Cheese Cotton Seed Oil Cow's Milk Crab Cranberry Cucumber Cumin Seed Curry Date

Dillseed Duck Eggplant Endive

English Walnut Fig Filbert Flounder

Food Coloring Mix Frog's Legs

Garden Peppers (Bell) Garlic Gelatin Ginger Goat's Milk Grape Grapefruit Haddock Halibut Herring Honey Honeydew Melon Hops Horseradish

Kale Kidney Bean Lake Perch Lake Trout Lamb Lemon Lentil Lettuce

Lima Bean Lime Lobster Mackerel

Malt Mango Maple Sugar Marjoram

Maroon Sweet Potato (Yam) Millet

Molasses Mozzarella Cheese MSG Mung Bean Mushroom Mustard

Nectarine Nutmeg (Mace)         Nutra Sweet Oats Okra Olive Onion

Orange Orange Roughy Fish Oregano Oyster Papaya Paprika

Parmesan Cheese Parsley Parsnip

Pea Peach Peanut Pear Pecan

Peppermint (Spearmint) Pheasant

Pike Pimiento Pineapple Pinto Bean

Pistachio Nut Plum (Prune) Pomegranate Pork Potato Provolone Cheese Pumpkin Quinoa Radish

Raspberry Red Snapper Rhubarb

Rice Rosemary Rutabaga Rye

Saccharin Safflower Seed Sage

Salicylate Salmon Sardine Scallops

Sea Perch Sesame Shark Shrimp

Smelt Sodium Metabisulfite Sole Sorbitol Sorghum Soybean Spelt

Spinach Split Pea Squash Mix

Strawberry String Bean (Green)

Sunflower Swiss Chard Swiss Cheese Swordfish Tapioca- Cassava-Yucca Tea Thyme Tobacco

Tomato Turmeric Tuna Turkey Turnip Vanilla Water Chestnuts

Watercress Watermelon Wheat Wheat Bran Wild Rice Yellow Sweet Potato Yogurt 

Download

INTERPRETATION OF FOOD INTOLERANCE TEST RESULTS:   Your test results show hypersensitive reaction to specific foods. This reaction is measured on a scale of 1 to 3 and it indicates damage or death of your blood cells during the testing procedure. Reaction level 1 is a weak reaction, level 2 is a moderate reaction and level 3 is a strong reaction.   The severity of symptoms caused by a weak reaction (reaction level 1) may be equal to the severity of symptoms caused by a moderate (reaction level 2) or a strong reaction (reaction level 3). It is therefore recommended that you avoid all foods which have shown a positive reaction for a certain period of time.   Food intolerance and food hypersensitivity may be treated (cleared) by a sustained avoidance of the offending foods. It may take you as little as 2 weeks or as long as 4 months of food avoidance to clear your food hypersensitivities.   We recommend that you avoid eating all offending foods for 1 month after you receive your test results. You may then wish to gradually reintroduce the reactive foods in your diet, one at a time. Eat a single meal of only the offending food. Eat foods in plain form without seasoning, sauces etc. For example, eat baked or broiled potatoes without butter, salt, pepper etc. Eat steamed green vegetables without seasoning and sauces. If possible reintroduce and test for foods first thing in the morning or at least 3 hours after you have eaten or drank anything. Make sure that you are feeling well on the day when you reintroduce and test for reactive foods. Watch for a change in your physical or emotional well being for the next 3 to 4 hours after you have eaten the reactive food. Do not eat or drink anything except distilled water. Avoid chemicals, fumes, perfumes and other potential allergens during this time.   Record all symptoms after your test meal.   If there is no reaction to a food during the testing, the food may be eaten on a rotational basis according to the individual tolerance level. For example chicken may be tolerated at 4 day intervals but other reactive foods may be tolerated at longer eating intervals.   It is recommended that you perform a periodic follow up intolerance test after the successful reintroduction of offending foods. 

Files coming soon.